Lotus photography, William Land Park

June and July are the months when local Sacramento photographers go crazy  about the lotus flowers at the William Land Park. Although I have photographed many for the third year in a row, I am finding it difficult to pick one I would like to share. However, I do feel a little more enthusiastic about the photos I took of the lotus leaves dancing in the wind. It will be a nice addition to my Chloroplast portfolio.

Summer is a low time for photography. Harsh light, long days, heat waves, haze, expensive gasoline, expensive lodging, crowds, fire, smoke. I long for the soft light of the autumn, the cool, clear and clean air.

Location: William Land Park, Sacramento, CA, USA;

Equipment: Nikon D750, AF-S NIKKOR 70-200mm F2.8G;

Settings: 200mm, f/3.2, 1/4000”, ISO 250;

Tips: Unlike the leaves in two of my previous posts, Anatomy of a monocot leaf and Branching patterns, which were illuminated from behind with the help of a speed-light, the lotus leaf above was completely illuminated from behind by the sun. The wind was blowing on the leaves and they were dancing with it. I used a fast shutter speed to freeze their movement.

 

Published by Alessandra Chaves

Photographer with a preference for nature photography in black and white and other abstractions.

6 thoughts on “Lotus photography, William Land Park

  1. You’ve got some excellent pictures in your chloroplast portfolio, with its emphasis on patterns and lighting. In this post you mention not liking harsh light, but that can lead to stark pictures playing shadows off against light.

    Like

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